The Battle of Stoke Field: A Bloody Rout Ends the Wars of the Roses

Now part of the Nottinghamshire countryside, the Battle of Stoke Field was witness to the final major conflict in the Wars of the Roses. Lambert Simnel, an imposter pretending to be Edward, Earl of Warwick, was used as a figurehead for the Yorkist rebel cause as they tried to re-establish their hold on the crown. In their last attempt to unseat Henry VII, The House of York suffered a crushing defeat in a bloody battle that killed some 7,000 men. Following the wars, rival claims between the House of Lancaster and the House of York were resolved and both dynasties were united, creating a new dynasty, the House of Tudor.

This blog accompanies my podcast episode, where I head over to the Nottinghamshire countryside to visit the Battle of Stoke Field. Joined by Kevin Winter from the Battlefields Trust, we take a walk around the site of the final battle in the Wars of the Roses. The images in this blog are intended to help you visualise some of the incredible information and areas of historical importance that Kevin shares. Put your boots on, it’s time to go for a stroll! 

The Battle of Stoke Field: The Gallery

Battle of Stoke Field
Kevin Winter with Sarah, The Tudor Travel Guide
Battle of Stoke Field looking towards the River Trent:
The view from Stoke Battlefield looking towards the River Trent: It was down this escarpment that the rebel troops fled and were massacred
Battle of Stoke Field walk
On the Battlefield Walk near the bottom of The Red Gutter
Kevin Winter standing adjacent to the local parish church. Note the deep grooves in the stonework where soldiers sharpened their blades prior to the battle.
Battle of Stoke Field, local churchyard
A memorial stone in the local churchyard commemorates the battle, fought on 16 June 1487 and the 7000 men who lost their lives that day.
St Mary Magdalene, Newark.
St Mary Magdalene, Newark. Henry VII came here after the battle to give thanks for his victory.
St Mary Magdalene, Newark.
The large stained glass window at the east end of the church shows Henry VII’s royal coat of arms in the bottom right hand corner.
St Mary Magdalene, Newark.
This shows the Royal Coat of Arms close up.
An ulna (forearm) bone, with a scar, believed to be from a weapon wound.
© The National Civil War Centre – Newark Museum
Remains of a skeleton from the Battle of Stoke Field
Remains of a skeleton from the Battle of Stoke Field showing battle wounds to the skull.
© The National Civil War Centre – Newark Museum
Remains of a skeleton from the Battle of Stoke Field
Remains of a skeleton from the Battle of Stoke Field. Notice the hole in the skull caused by a penetrating weapon.
© The National Civil War Centre – Newark Museum

Links & Further Reading

Associated podcast episode

The Battlefields Trust

Battlefield Trust – upcoming walks and events

Battlefields Trust – Battle of Stoke Field Resource Centre

Nottinghamshire County Council – Battle of Stoke Field information and videos

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3 Comments

  1. A fascinating story of a little known battle. Many thanks to Sarah and Kevin Winter of The Battlefields Trust ?

  2. Absolutely captivating! Probably one of my absolute favorite podcasts/ accompanying photos that Sarah has done. I could see – and hear – the absolute horror of those few days where 7000 people died all the way here in Oregon, USA. Well worth the hour plus time. Thank you, Dr. Sarah and Kevin Winter!

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