The 1502 Progress: Coberley Hall, Gloucestershire
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The 1502 Progress: Coberley Hall, Gloucestershire

John Felde gromes [grooms] of the Quenes chambre for thaire costes wayting upon the Quenes joyelles [jewels] from Langley to Northlache [Northleach] from Northlache to Coberley from Coberley to the Vineyarde from the Vyneyarde to Flexley Abbey from Flexley Abbey to Troye and from Troye to Ragland by the space of vj dayes…
Privy Purse Expenses of Elizabeth of York, 2 September 1502.

Just as with Northleach, the only way we know that Elizabeth and Henry travelled through Coberley on the 1502 progress is on account of an entry into Elizabeth’s Privy Purse, recording money paid to the Grooms of the Queen’s Chamber for their part in transporting her jewels from place to place alongside Elizabeth’s household.

This blog details the history of Coberley Hall and the royal visit of 1502.

3-Day Itinerary: London
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3-Day Itinerary: London

If you are visiting London, have three days to spend, and are wondering about some of the fascinating Tudor places you might explore, then look no further! I have curated some of my personal favourite locations to uncover.

While the first two days cover off what I call ‘the BIG three’ must-see locations. However, day three will bring some respite from the crowds. While staying in central London, I am taking you further afield to explore some of my favourite and certainly less often visited Tudor-themed places. However, if you find yourself with more time and may be looking for extra extra inspiration, you can check out my 5-day London guide, which builds on the three days outlined here. Also, I am including a link to download my ‘Tudor London Made Easy Guide’. This highlights 17 locations in London with links to Tudor history.

2-Day Itinerary: London
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2-Day Itinerary: London

If you are visiting London but only have two days to spare and you are wondering about some of the must-see Tudor places in London to visit, then look no further! Here are my recommendations for my ‘BIG three’ must-see locations: Westminster Abbey and Hall, The Tower of London and Hampton Court Palace. However, if you need extra inspiration for more places to visit, or you are looking to substitute in a different location, then I am including a link to download my ‘Tudor London Made Easy Guide’. This highlights 17 locations in London with links to Tudor history.

In the meantime, let’s do some immersive time travelling!

5-Day Itinerary: London
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5-Day Itinerary: London

If you are visiting London, have five days to spend, and are wondering about some of the most fascinating Tudor places you might explore, then look no further! I have curated some of my personal favourite locations to uncover. While some are essential bucket-list destinations, others are well-hidden or largely off the usual tourist trail. However, they are all steeped in Tudor history and will surely satisfy your craving for some intensive Tudor time-travelling.

While the first two days cover off what I call ‘the BIG three’ must-see locations, days four and five will lead you further afield to explore some lesser-known Tudor-themed places. However, if you need extra inspiration, I am including a link to download my ‘Tudor London Made Easy Guide’. This highlights 17 locations in London with links to Tudor history, adding a couple more destinations not mentioned below.

I have also included the map below, so that you can see the spatial distribution of the following locations. Let’s go time travelling!

The 1502 Progress of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York
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The 1502 Progress of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York

Welcome to the 1502 progress!
For this journey, we are principally following in the footsteps of Elizabeth of York during the 1502 summer progress. It would be Elizabeth’s last summer on Earth. She would die shortly after giving birth to a baby girl the following February.
The progress comes on the back of several deeply personal losses for Elizabeth and Henry VII, including the death of Prince Arthur just three months earlier.
Thus, we see an unusual progress and one the looks rather more like a trip down memory lane than the usual state affair, as the King and queen grapple with their grief.
IN this progress we will be heading from Woodstock in Oxfordshire to Raglan Castle and back again. ready to join me on progress?

The 1502 Progress: Tudor Northleach, Gloucestershire
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The 1502 Progress: Tudor Northleach, Gloucestershire

Northleach was the second documented stop on the 1502 progress of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York after leaving the Old Manor at Woodstock ….There were six, or perhaps, seven stages that broke up the journey from Woodstock in Oxfordshire to their destination, Raglan Castle in South-East Wales. This suggests a rhythm of one day of travelling followed by one day of rest. This makes sense when Elizabeth’s pregnancy and recent illness.

But why did the King choose to rest in Northleach – the answer to that question is explored in this post

The 1502 Progress: The Old Manor of Langley, Langley, Oxfordshire
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The 1502 Progress: The Old Manor of Langley, Langley, Oxfordshire

Around 5 August, Henry VII and Elizabeth of York arrived at The Old Manor of Langley. Elizabeth seems to have recovered from her sickness; at least enough to continued the onward journey. This brief period of illness may have been related to her pregnancy. However, as we shall see shortly, the Privy Purse account points out that the Queen was not the only member of her household to fall ill while at Woodstock