5-Day Itinerary: London
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5-Day Itinerary: London

If you are visiting London, have five days to spend, and are wondering about some of the most fascinating Tudor places you might explore, then look no further! I have curated some of my personal favourite locations to uncover. While some are essential bucket-list destinations, others are well-hidden or largely off the usual tourist trail. However, they are all steeped in Tudor history and will surely satisfy your craving for some intensive Tudor time-travelling.

While the first two days cover off what I call ‘the BIG three’ must-see locations, days four and five will lead you further afield to explore some lesser-known Tudor-themed places. However, if you need extra inspiration, I am including a link to download my ‘Tudor London Made Easy Guide’. This highlights 17 locations in London with links to Tudor history, adding a couple more destinations not mentioned below.

I have also included the map below, so that you can see the spatial distribution of the following locations. Let’s go time travelling!

A Long Weekend Away in Tudor Derbyshire & South Yorkshire
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A Long Weekend Away in Tudor Derbyshire & South Yorkshire

In this guide, we travel to Derbyshire and just over the county border into South Yorkshire to visit Sheffield as we go on the trail of one of the most powerful families of the Tudor age: The Shrewsburys. 

The Earls of Shrewsbury were at the heart of Tudor intrigue throughout the sixteenth century, and in this long weekend itinerary, we explore two Shrewsbury properties, Hardwick Hall and Sheffield Manor Lodge. We will admire three magnificent tombs; those of the 4th and 6th Earls and the latter’s indomitable wife, Bess of Hardwick, before we round off our trip by a visit to Haddon Hall, a glorious medieval and Tudor time capsule in the heart of the Derbyshire Dales.

So, let’s get going!

A Tudor Weekend in Monmouthshire
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A Tudor Weekend in Monmouthshire

Monmouthshire in South East Wales is a delightful area to visit. Two locations included in this itinerary are in the Wye Valley, just inside the Welsh border, in an area considered to be of outstanding natural beauty.

This two-day interary will take you to visit two fabulous castles and a ruined abbey. Chepstow Castle has deep roots in early medieval history, while Raglan was created as luxurious a palace-fortress during the fifteenth century by the powerful Herbert family. It’s connections to Henry VII make it a must-see location for anyone interested in early Tudor history. Finally, you can drive or walk to the idyllic Tintern Abbey, renowned for the beauty of its location, adjacent to the River Wye.

So, let us go exploring three wonderful Welsh locations…

A Four-Day Tour of Tudor Suffolk
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A Four-Day Tour of Tudor Suffolk

Suffolk is one of my favourote counties for exploring Tudor buildings and their stories and yet, curiously, I often find it overlooked by overseas travellers. I consider it one of my missions to put Tudor Suffolk well and truly on any tudor time traveller’s map . From one of the most stunning collections of Tudor tombs outside Westminster Abbey to the world’s largest and most authentic Tudor reenactment festival, Suffolk is a glorious place to explore. So, let me show you an action-packed itinerary for a three-day stay in the area. Let’s go!

A Six-Day Tour of Tudor North Yorkshire
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A Six-Day Tour of Tudor North Yorkshire

This six-day tour of North Yorkshire will take you to the majestic abbeys and mighty castles that are synonymous with the county. It incorporates the great city of York, a northern stronghold in the Tudor period.  There is plenty of medieval and Tudor history to enjoy. So, let’s get time travelling!

The 1502 Progress of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York
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The 1502 Progress of Henry VII & Elizabeth of York

Welcome to the 1502 progress!
For this journey, we are principally following in the footsteps of Elizabeth of York during the 1502 summer progress. It would be Elizabeth’s last summer on Earth. She would die shortly after giving birth to a baby girl the following February.
The progress comes on the back of several deeply personal losses for Elizabeth and Henry VII, including the death of Prince Arthur just three months earlier.
Thus, we see an unusual progress and one the looks rather more like a trip down memory lane than the usual state affair, as the King and queen grapple with their grief.
IN this progress we will be heading from Woodstock in Oxfordshire to Raglan Castle and back again. ready to join me on progress?

Northleach, Gloucestershire
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Northleach, Gloucestershire

Northleach was the second documented stop on the 1502 progress of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York after leaving the Old Manor at Woodstock ….There were six, or perhaps, seven stages that broke up the journey from Woodstock in Oxfordshire to their destination, Raglan Castle in South-East Wales. This suggests a rhythm of one day of travelling followed by one day of rest. This makes sense when Elizabeth’s pregnancy and recent illness.

But why did the King choose to rest in Northleach – the answer to that question is explored in this post

The Old Manor of Langley, Langley, Oxfordshire
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The Old Manor of Langley, Langley, Oxfordshire

Around 5 August, Henry VII and Elizabeth of York arrived at The Old Manor of Langley. Elizabeth seems to have recovered from her sickness; at least enough to continued the onward journey. This brief period of illness may have been related to her pregnancy. However, as we shall see shortly, the Privy Purse account points out that the Queen was not the only member of her household to fall ill while at Woodstock